The 2017 Precedent Setter Awards

 

Staircase at the Aga Khan MuseumWant to know how to spot a first-rate lawyer? Well, there are three easy giveaways. One, they’ve mastered their field of law, with a track record to prove it. Two, they offer time to organizations that help the community. And three, they can’t help but look fierce against the crisp, awe-inspiring backdrop of the Aga Khan Museum.

Okay, so maybe the judges of this year’s Precedent Setter Awards didn’t consider that last one in their deliberations. But the first two were definitely on their minds. See below to meet six outstanding lawyers, all in their first 10 years of practice, looking pretty damn determined at one of Toronto’s architectural wonders.

 

 

 


The Winners

Konata Lake

Konata Lake
Associate, Torys LLP
Read Konata’s profile

Clara Pham

Clara Pham
Director of Tax, Restaurant Brands International Corporation
Read Clara’s profile

Justin Safeyeni

Justin Safayeni
Associate, Stockwoods LLP
Read Justin’s profile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shaneka Taylor

Shaneka Taylor
Associate, Boghosian + Allen LLP
Read Shaneka’s profile

Glenford Jameson

Glenford Jameson
Principal, G. S. Jameson & Company
Read Glenford’s profile

Emily Lam

Emily Lam
Partner, Greenwood Lam LLP
Read Emily’s profile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


The Judges

Katherine Hensel, Founder, Hensel Barristers

Leila Rafi, Partner, McMillan LLP

Paul Jonathan Saguil, Associate VP, TD Bank

Brendan Wong, Partner, Borden Ladner Gervais LLP


Behind-the-scenes photos

Check out the behind-the-scenes photos from the photo shoot with the winners!

017 Precedent Setter Awards - Behind-the-scenes photo shoot


Precedent Summer 2017 IssueThis story is from our Summer 2017 issue.

 

 

 


Photography by Lorne Bridgman, hair and makeup by Shawna Lee, shot on location at the Aga Khan Museum.

Precedent Setter Awards 2017: Glenford Jameson

Glenford Jameson

Principal, G. S. Jameson & Company
Called to the bar in 2012

Are crickets safe to eat? That’s the sort of legal question that gets Glenford Jameson excited. One of his clients, an Ontario cricket producer (seriously, it’s a thing), needed to prove that they are, in order to secure approval to sell its brand of edible crickets. “The problem is that no one in the developed world eats them, so there’s no scientific data or existing set of regulations,” says Jameson. “But crickets are a common source of food in the developing world.” He dove into a sea of ethnobiological research — for instance, on the Aka people of Central Africa in the 1980s — and showed that humans have safely ingested crickets for millennia. His client won approval, and the crickets will soon be at major grocery stores.

Glenford JamesonJameson, a 34-year-old lawyer in his fourth year of solo practice, is already a leading expert in food law. The area is booming: in recent years, the number of new specialty foods for sale has exploded.

Much of his job, then, is to help everyone from big-name retailers to farm-to-table growers navigate the laws that regulate how their products are produced, labelled and sold. “Retailers and producers are both struggling to keep up,” he says.

Jameson is lucky: he’s found a way to merge his lifelong foodieism with work. He lives in Little India with his fiancée, Elizabeth Cavaliere, and they keep close tabs on the local restaurant scene. He also launched a monthly podcast, Welcome to the Food Court, last summer. It’s important to him to share his food-law knowledge — on topics like micro-batch whiskey and fraudulent fish — with the public. His enthusiasm is boundless. “It’s way easier to stay motivated when you do something you care about.”


Don’t forget to read about our other amazing winners.


Photography by Lorne Bridgman, hair and makeup by Shawna Lee, shot on location at the Aga Khan Museum.